A Review of “Authorized: The Use & Misuse of the King James Bible”: Introduction

Introduction 

I wrote the first article on this blog on September 4, 2019. Since then, I have sought to tackle the theological problems of the Modern Critical Text, the CBGM, the modern doctrine of inspiration, as well as to shine light on many of the positions of the men and women who are actively involved in creating Bibles for the Christian church. I have examined the weaknesses of the Chicago Statement on Biblical Inerrancy, and presented the Scriptural and historical theological position of Protestant Christianity. Up until this point, the focus of this blog has been especially to examine the theological implications of the modern critical methods and associated texts. Having said what I have to say regarding that, I want to now turn to reviewing a work by Mark Ward called “Authorized: The Use & Misuse of the King James Bible.” 

My goal in reviewing this work is manifold. I want to use it as an opportunity to examine the power of rhetoric, to clarify places of misrepresentation or perhaps misunderstanding within the pages of Ward’s work, and to present simple counter arguments to the many claims made by Ward. I plan to do this in a series of articles, and I imagine the scope of what I have set out to cover may expand as I go. I want to provide an analysis and in some places, refutation, of the content found within Ward’s work. In this first article, I will begin reviewing the introduction by taking a look at three notable components – rhetoric, anecdotes, and a narrative. 

Rhetoric, Anecdotes, and a Narrative

Rhetoric

Beginning with the cover of Authorized: The Use & Misuse of the King James Bible, the reader is introduced to the whimsical tone of Mark Ward. Starting with the title, the reader can expect to encounter at least two major themes that will be covered: How the King James Bible (KJV) can be used, and how it can be misused. The introduction gives the reader a good idea of how the rest of the book will feel. Ward weaves facts and quippy commentary together, providing a 1) statistic or statement, followed by 2) some sort of joke or anecdote, and 3) ending with a concluding thought. This pattern is exemplified in the first three sentences of the book. 

“1) Out of every 100 Americans who pulled a Bible off a shelf today, 55 of them pulled down a King James Version. 2) I feel fairly safe in saying that the King James is the only 1611 release still on any bestseller lists. 3) All the same, 55 percent is only slightly more than half, and the trend line is clear—for it started near 100 percent. The English-speaking Christian church, which was once almost completely unified in using the KJV, is no longer unified around a particular Bible translation. Why? Because people say they can no longer understand it.”

Mark Ward, Authorized: The Use & Misuse of the King James Bible, ed. Elliot Ritzema, Lynnea Fraser, and Danielle Thevenaz (Bellingham, WA: Lexham Press, 2018), 1.

This writing style demonstrates the power of rhetoric in giving validity to an opinion. It is a hallmark of well-written persuasive writing. To demonstrate this point, note in the quoted passage above. Ward begins with a data point – 55% of Christians who read a Bible read a King James. He inserts a joke, and then provides his opinion that this clearly demonstrates that his interpretation of this number is that King James readership is on the decline. He then offers an explanation for this data point – that people simply cannot understand the KJV any longer. 

This is arguably the most foundational premise of the entire book – that people cannot understand the KJV any longer. Yet this claim is contradicted by the data point he provided in the first sentence of the work, that 55% of Christians who read their Bible, read a King James. That is to say, of the people who read their Bible, most of them can understand the KJV. Further, this explanation leaves the reader wanting for an adequate explanation of this data point. If it is true that people are abandoning the KJV because they can’t understand it, why do most Christians read it? It should be noted that one of the key textbooks used to train pastors is Bruce Metzger and Bart Ehrman’s The Text of the New Testament: Its Transmission, Corruption, and Restoration, which is a major contributing factor in other translations capturing 45% of readership. It should also be noted that no other translation even comes close to the 55% readership number that the King James enjoys. 

By presenting part of the whole picture, the reader is introduced to a partial explanation, though it is presented as the whole explanation for why the King James Bible, according to Ward, should be on its way out. In doing this, Ward is able to present the case that the only reason people retain the KJV is due to “habit, conviction, or merely a loyalty and love that we quite naturally attach to things we value.” Ward does not address a fundamental group that retains the KJV – those who do so because the underlying manuscript readings are preserved, and that the translation of those readings is most accurate. So we see how rhetoric is a powerful tool used to funnel the reader down a path that misses a primary reason many people retain the KJV. This is a critical flaw with the premise of the book. If the reason people are abandoning the KJV, assuming they are, is due to its difficult vocabulary and syntax, why is it still the most widely read Bible version in the English speaking world? Is it possible that there is more to this story that the reader is not being told? Abundantly so. 

Anecdotes 

Ward’s anecdotes demonstrate that I may be onto something with my first point. 

“I grew up reading and hearing the KJV, and I don’t recall having any trouble with the verbiage. I don’t remember ever being baffled by, “We had been as Sodoma” (Rom 9:29) or “Let him that glorieth glory in this” (Jer 9:24). Early on I felt a sufficient mastery of Elizabethan diction not only to read it but to speak it. I even remember as a third grader asking my beloved teacher, Mrs. Page, if we could all use King James English for a day. (She said yes, but it never happened.… Little kids remember these things.) Somehow toddlers managed to learn this style of speech, in a time before not just antibiotics but Sesame Street.”

Ibid., 1

So it seems that Ward, who grew up reading the KJV, even as a child, had no issues reading and even speaking it. He was taught to read the KJV growing up, and therefore he could read the KJV growing up. This anecdote is devastating to the narrative presented as the introduction continues. The point of highlighting this is that the premise of the book is that people simply don’t understand KJV English, which Ward has seemingly debunked in the first few pages of his book. 

The Narrative 

The reader has seen two vitally important pieces of information thus far: That most Christians who read their Bible can understand the KJV, and that Ward can understand the KJV. This seems to work against his premise that people are abandoning the KJV because “they can no longer understand it.” Here is where the reader is presented with a narrative, which essentially goes like this: “Many people cannot understand KJV English, and therefore it is on its way out, and we should allow it to retire gracefully.” 

“But there are people, many people, who insist that KJV English is too difficult. Many of them, in turn, have already jettisoned the KJV.”

Ibid., 1,2

Those that do not read the KJV seem to be the intended audience for this work. Ward even points out that the New York Times, hardly a bastion of intellectuals, frequently uses phrases which find their origin in the King James Bible. He even employs a word found in the KJV, “Hitherto,” and a phrase which he incorrectly attributes to “Oh wait – that last one’s from Shakespeare. Or was it Ben Franklin?” A brief internet search will inform the reader that neither is correct. 

While it is true that people find the KJV difficult to read, it seems, based on the data Ward presents the reader with, that most Christians who read their Bible (55%) do not. It appears then that the audience for this work are those “who insist that KJV English is too difficult.” So the premise of the book does not seem to be based  on Ward’s personal experience reading the KJV, or with the data that says most Bible reading Christians can read the KJV, but rather on the “people, many people,” who cannot understand it.  

Conclusion

The introduction of Ward’s book is interesting. He introduces the reader to data and anecdotes which point towards the reality that the KJV is readable, while setting up a narrative which says it’s not. Further, Ward explains how he himself came to understand KJV English, by being taught KJV English growing up. At the end of the introduction, Ward leaves his reader with this interesting thought:

 
“So what do we do with the KJV? Teach people to read it? Revise it? Chuck it? No, no, and no. Read on.” (Ibid., 4.)

Despite being taught KJV English growing up, Ward argues against teaching people to read it. The reader should wonder, like I was, what is going on that I do not know? If the KJV is readable, and Ward could read it as a child, what is the dilemma here? What problem is trying to be solved, and what is Ward’s answer? We will find out his alternative recommendation in the following chapters, I imagine. 

In the introduction, Ward makes two understated observations:

  1. The transition away from the KJV has brought confusion and conflict within the church 
  2. The Christian church, once unified around the KJV, is no longer unified around a Bible translation

These seem extremely important, and I am looking forward to seeing if Ward offers any solutions to this problem that the introduction of new Bibles has presented to the modern church. 

8 thoughts on “A Review of “Authorized: The Use & Misuse of the King James Bible”: Introduction

  1. I feel this argument of Ward is not honest but it is the popular argument.

    What we are being asked to accept in these modern translations is not just an updated use of language for ease of reading. I wish that was all it was. But a shift to giving priority to another set of underlying manuscripts.

    What they are doing is hiding the ball. I feel the real goal is to move all Christians to a new doctrine of scripture represented in these modern translations. To move from a TR translation to a CT translation.

    The Christian reading the KJV knows this even if they can’t articulate it. Many men I know that read the KJV have no idea about the TR vs CT arguments but they know that the new translations “remove verses” (their words) from the Bible. And so based on this they reject the new translations.

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    1. Yep. Ward seems have hidden agendas. Hopefully this article points out that his stated argument doesn’t seem to make sense.

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  2. Thanks for doing this! I’m sorry I’m so late in coming to read it. I look forward to the rest!

    On a personal note, I greatly respect the KJV (and even just purchased the Mahogany Calfskin Schuyler Trevaris), and I am definitely a TR advocate, but I really dislike preaching from the KJV. I much prefer the NKJV for that (and most reading too – although I did just last week preach Psalm 19 from the KJV, so there’s that…). I guess it’s just the shift in diction between reading a portion of the text and the preaching in my vernacular. It’s jarring and almost “artificial” – I’m not sure if that’s the right word. Feels like I’m putting on airs or something to read from a Bible that sounds like no one talks – even me who is doing the talking. I’m sure a lot of that is about what you’re used to, but I am definitely glad that we have the NKJV to fill the middle ground niche.

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    1. Thank you for this comment! I’m glad the NKJV has helped you to fill the middle ground. We personally do not have this issue, probably because we pray in and sometimes preach in the King’s English.

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  3. Most people I know who do not like the KJV also don’t like to read at all. I was one of those people years ago, and I think it is foolish for someone to say we shouldn’t learn to read the KJV. Dr. Thackaway who preached on the importance of why the KJV was translated the way it was helps us understand that the KJV wasn’t written in Elizabethan or Jacobean English, but rather “Biblical English.” The structure isn’t like that of Elizabethan or Jacobean English, and the foolish assertion is still being put forward to those ignorant of the issue that it is. Even if the KJV wasn’t the best translation out there, the value it has had influencing our western society should at least put it forward as worth reading. I find it strange that he says it is difficult to understand. I wasn’t raised on the KJV, but rather the 1984 NIV. When I finally picked up the KJV to read it after my conversion I didn’t find it that difficult to read. The truth is that I always keep a dictionary handy while reading, regardless of the style of English. I run across words all of the time that I either don’t know or don’t remember the meaning. It is clear that the work you are reviewing is a hit piece on the KJV and it is a marketing ploy to promote modern translations of the Bible.

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    1. I really appreciate your comment. That is exactly my experience as well. I was told by a close friend when I read the ESV daily to read the KJV at least once due to its importance to the English language and our theological language. The KJV is important for every Christian, regardless.

      I also found that switching from the ESV to the KJV was not difficult at all. I keep my Logos pulled up anyway when I’m reading to check commentaries and my interlinear. Every Christian has access to a dictionary on their phone, and I’d be shocked if Christians didn’t reference a dictionary every now and then, regardless of the translation they read.

      Thanks again!

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